Posts Tagged ‘rave’

Hospitality Romania 2017

Bristol BBQ XL: Badass Selections from Micky Finn & Aphrodite

urbantakeover

Jungle and drum & bass are littered with iconic duos: Fabio & Grooverider, Ed Rush & Optical, Subzero & Original Sin, Calyx & Teebee, DJ Die & Krust… the list goes on.

There are few, however, that can rival both the production and DJ’ing powerhouses that are Micky Finn and Aphrodite, and these brothers in arms will be one of many leading the junglist charge at our XL Bristol BBQ at Motion come June.

Often producing collaborations between their individual aliases and running the label ‘Urban Takeover’ together, Aphrodite and Micky Finn; alongside friend Claudio Giussani, were also known as ‘Urban Shakedown’. A name which will be all too familiar with the drum & bass veterans among us.

To celebrate the sheer quality these respective artists maintain both individually and collectively, we thought it only right to dish out our personal top 5 dancefloor fillers from the monolithic men themselves to hype you up for their keenly anticipated B2B.

Aphrodite & Micky Finn Ft. MC GQ – Dark Selector

A seminal track that ignites raves in a way that few other tracks do. Deliciously groovy and seriously funky, this roller is a timeless drum & bass anthem. The bad-boy vocals from the legendary MC GQ give it an extra potent edge and the arrangement throughout is spot on. Massive track.

Aphrodite & Micky Finn – Drop Top Caddy

Vintage Aphrodite & Micky Finn. Rugged and funky rap samples, sublime arrangement and a crisp bassline that leads the way in forging the tracks sonic atmosphere. Working in harmony with the raw hip-hop elements, this gruff stepper sounds as funky fresh today as it did 20 years ago.

Aphrodite & Micky Finn – Bass of The Tramp

More certified dopeness from these drum & bass dons. A beautifully wobbly bassline combined with excellent sample chopping renders this as one of the most iconic precursors to modern jump up drum & bass. Simple elements, but complex composition and arrangement see a fairly minimal set of ingredients mixed up to cook a serious tune, one of my personal favourites.

Urban Shakedown – Some Justice ’95 (Arsonist Dub Beats)

One of the most famous tracks on this list. A true jungle classic. Originally a dubplate re-work of their 91/92 big hitter, this track saw release in the shape of Some Justice ’95. A militant bassline and ragga vocals combined with beautiful drum rolls and breaks throughout. This is jungle music at it’s finest.

Aphrodite & Micky Finn – Bad Ass

Probably Micky Finn & Aphrodite’s most famous collaboration. You’ll struggle to find any drum & bass enthusiast worth their salt who doesn’t know this seminal anthem, as common in the dance today as it was two decades ago! A roller simply oozing with vibes, the cheekiness of the bassline juxtaposed with the vocals amount to a genuine drum & bass tour de force.

There you have it. Five tracks guaranteed to get any party started. These guys made gazillion more amazing tracks so we encourage you to find your favourite and comment your all time number ones. But if you want a real taste of what these guys do, then you’ll have to come down to the Bristol BBQ on the 10th of June to see these musical magicians in action.

BristolBBQXL_FB_4-1 (1)

GET TICKETS // JOIN THE EVENT

Words Ed Priest

Posted 8th May 2017 in Features

Hospitality Bristol 04.03.17

Hospitality Bristol 04.03.17 @ Motion, Bristol

 

Posted 27th April 2017 in Photos

GigSoup – Hospitality In The Dock 14th April

17972153_1406580669379944_8974214828248146892_o

Words by Zoe Anderson

Hospital Records certainly have their heads screwed on right. After twenty-one years in the game, the infamous drum and bass record label is still churning out some serious talent, with names like High Contrast and Camo and Krooked all under their wing. If you’re a d’n’b fan in the UK, it’s more than likely that you’ve either been to, or heard of one of Hospitality’s legendary events that spring up all around the country more than a handful of times a year. Their scope is so far reaching now, that they can command control of huge venues and sound systems that shake the earth and draw in thousands of people.
………

 

The main star of the show however, was always going to be The Great Gallery. After electrifying sets from S.P.Y and Nu:Logic (a collaboration of Nu:Tone and Logistics) there was a swift change over to make way for Dutch electronic trio Noisia. Their act was to be the grand-finale of a very fast-paced, high intensity day of music, and their hour set was billed as a multi-media stage experience, rather than a typical live performance. The trio sported strange flashing hoods as they took to the stage, and their set was accompanied by a constant stream of psychedelic visuals. As a spectacle, the set was hugely impressive, drawing in all kinds of creative elements to create a visually gorgeous experience. Unfortunately, their hard-hitting music seemed to get lost in the mix somewhere, and their sound became oddly disjoined as their set moved on.

Read full article here

 

Posted 24th April 2017 in Reviews

HITD After Party at Fabric 14.04.17: They Closed It, you Saved It. Hospitality Returns!

Where to even begin?

You don’t need us to tell you what Fabric is or how much we love the place, but maybe the reasons why we love it deserve a bit more of an explanation.

It would be easy to simply say it is the best club in London (or even the world) without needing an explanation, however the beauty of Fabric is that it has not felt the pressure to change from its jungle roots since it opened almost 18 years ago. Looking for a night of raucous raving? Fabric. Interested in what new artists are coming through the scene? Fabric! Over its three rooms you can find a different and unique vibe in each one, every week. Adapting to a constantly changing genre can be disorientating for some venues, but not for Fabric. New artists with new sounds are forever being birthed and given their rite of passage to packed out rooms of all ages making it an experience that is unlikely to be forgotten.

Goldie on stage at fabric

When jungle first spilled onto the streets of London in the early 90’s, electronic bass music took a sharp turn from the mainstream and enticing a new breed of DJ. Artists such as Dillinja and Lemon D arrived on the scene to give pop culture a punch in the chest, with massive drops and pulverising bass that had until that point not been utilised by popular music. Venues such as Paradise in Islington became a hot spot for the post-hardcore crowd who wanted to experience something closer to the fringes of current trends. More venues across London began to pop up and introduce dedicated nights, such as Rage nights hosted every Thursday at Heaven in Charing Cross and Thunder & Joy at the Astoria. The scene was taking off and drawing crowds from the Acid House movement it began it’s dominance of nightclubs through the decade.

 

 

Now it wasn’t until ’99 that our favourite club opened its doors in a quiet road in Farringdon, with Craig Richards and Terry Francis as their resident DJ’s. It had opened at the same time as another club called Home which, at the time, had enlisted Paul Oakenfold and Danny Rampling to play regular sets. As Fabric themselves have written ‘while Home took out full-page ads in glossy magazines, Fabric’s marketing was resolutely understated’, and this idea of going against the grain has stayed consistent with Fabric to this day. Clubs that opened at the same time have all now shut their doors, but Fabric remains as a focal point for electronic music lovers. What set Fabric apart from mainstream dance clubs was the distinct lack of glitz and glamour, no dress code, no dressing to impress. It was focussed on the experience of losing yourself in a crowd of like-minded music lovers, dazzled by the epic light shows that were displayed in each room with a constant stream of breakthrough electronic acts. The ‘marketing strategy’ was literally down to flyering and the occasional poster you would see around the capital with the slightly mysterious, although now synonymous, cut out club logo which would seek to intrigue punters to find out more. Before long it was the destination for bass nights with every weekend more epic than the last.

 

381917_310531198984902_340248704_nFred V & Grafix at Fabric

 

Now we at Hospitality have a particularly close relationship with the guys and girls at fabric and many a-story to tell. After our last show in 2012 which was an absolute riot with a very young Fred V & Grafix as well as S.P.Y and Camo & Krooked, we couldn’t wait to come back. However it seemed that the chance of playing at Fabric again had been taken away from us. In our complacency to book the club again we didn’t realise that their was an impending inquiry that would threaten Fabric’s very existence. It was with with a massive shock we learned that Fabric would close its doors for the final time in September 2016 due to Islington council revoking its licence. The decision was backed by the Met police as, according to both authorities, the club had been the cause of two drug related deaths of two 18 year old patrons. Whilst the news of the two young men who had lost their lives was devastating to hear, the decision had been made that fabric was responsible and the public outcry was immense. Within hours of their licence being revoked the organisers at fabric being work on a campaign to bring the club back, requesting help from punters, organisers and artists to rally together to #savefabric.

 

Save-Fabric-protestCrowds gathered outside fabric after the announcement

Within hours the entire world was set ablaze with passionate posts across social media, DJ’s pledging their support and beseeching their fans to do the same. DJ Goldie said to Channel 4 News ‘when you look at all the clubs that have closed down over the years, Fabric is the Goliath’. He went on to passionately describe just some of the epic nights that he’s had there as well as ‘feeling sorry for the kids of tomorrow’ as they would be unable to experience and learn from what Fabric has to offer. The petition that was started gained over 150,000 signatures in a matter of days urging the council to repeal their decision with both #savefabric and #saveourculture trending on Twitter for weeks. The first appeal was dismissed at a council meeting despite dozens of protestors being in attendance, including the Hospitality crew. The point that was trying to be made was fabric is not just a club, or just a place to go and jump around a bit, fabric is a staple for music in London and has spurred on young musicians for almost 20 years. It mustn’t close, it cannot, for the British music institution would struggle to recover. The pressure on Islington council was steadily ramping up to a fever pitch, even London Mayor Sadiq Khan took to the media to express his opinion: ‘As a result of this decision, thousands of people who enjoyed ‎going to Fabric as an essential part of London’s nightlife will lose out.’ Well said Mr Mayor, we couldn’t agree more. It was now the combination of the worldwide support, plus our Mayor being behind us that we, the public, had a legitimate voice in this fight and on December 2nd fabric officially announced they would be reopening in the new year.

FbricFabric’s reopening party

If you haven’t already guessed by now, we’re rather fond of this place. The chance to play in its hallowed rooms again for our official Hospitality in the Dock Afterparty on April 14th is a dream come true, especially since we thought this moment would never happen again. You might have heard before that you only miss something when it’s gone and while it’s cliché there is a certain truth to it. Fabric was on the edge of extinction but you saved it, making it one for the history books. Our opportunity to bring Hospitality back to Fabric is something we’re incredibly excited about, with another huge lineup and a big dose of nostalgia, make sure you’re there to witness Hospitality’s resurgence with the one and only fabric.

See you April 14th!

GET TICKETS // JOIN THE EVENT

Words by Andy Napleton

Posted 3rd March 2017 in Blog, Features

Hospitality at Building Six